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Gentlemen,

I’ve uploaded the semester project rubric to the BOX on the right. Please download the rubric and review it before class on Tuesday. You will be graded by the rubric, so make sure your project meets the requirements. I’ll see you in class tomorrow. Also, make sure your parents are aware that class has been extended to 8:30pm.

Mr. Oldacre

Gentlemen,

Your assignments for our final class have been posted. I hope you’re working hard on your semester projects. Make sure to ask your parents if it is ok with them to extend the final class to 8:30. I will be posting a grading rubric for your project, so check back and make sure you review the rubric. If you have any questions about your project or the paper from last semester, please leave a comment.

Thanks for all of your hard work this semester. I hope you have learned something and enjoyed the class.

Mr. Oldacre

Gentlemen,

Our class is almost over; can you believe it? Your assignments have been posted for May 3rd. We’ll be diving in to W. E. B. Du Bois’ The Souls of Black Folk, so here is some background information (courtesy of Barnes & Noble):

One of the most influential books ever published in America, W. E. B. Du Bois’s The Souls of Black Folk is an eloquent collection of fourteen essays that describe the life, the ambitions, the struggles, and the passions of African Americans at the transition from the nineteenth to the twentieth century.

The first African American to receive a Ph.D. from Harvard University, Du Bois was a sociologist, historian, novelist, and activist whose astounding career spanned the nation’s history from Reconstruction to the Civil Rights Movement. In The Souls of Black Folk, published in 1903, Du Bois argued against the conciliatory position taken by Booker T. Washington, at the time the most influential black leader in America, and called for a more radical form of aggressive protest—a strategy that would anticipate and inspire much of the activism of the 1960s.

Du Bois’s essays were the first to articulate many of Black America’s thoughts and feelings, including the dilemma posed by the black psyche’s “double consciousness,” which Du Bois described as “this twoness—an American, a Negro; two souls, two thoughts, two unreconciled strivings . . . in one dark body.” Every essay in The Souls of Black Folk is a jewel of intellectual prowess, eloquent language, and groundbreaking insight. It is essential reading for anyone interested in the struggle for Civil Rights in America.

Farah Jasmine Griffin is Professor of English and Comparative Literature and African-American Studies at Columbia University in New York City.”

Gentlemen,

Would any of you be ready to present your semester projects on May 3? Please leave a comment only if you are able to present your semester projects on May 3.

Gentlemen,

Your assignments have been posted for our next class. If you have questions, please leave a comment.

Gentlemen,

Your final topic, artifact idea, presentation idea, and paper summary are due today. Please email this assignment to me if you have not done so already.

Gentlemen,

Your assignments for the March 8th class have been posted. Please let me know if you have any questions.

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