Gentlemen,

I have uploaded a semester project planning document in the BOX to the right. Please download, read, and complete this item and bring it to class on Tuesday.

Mr. Oldacre

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Gentlemen,

Your assignments are posted under the assignments page. Our first book is Fahrenheit 451. I will also include more information about the semester project as a document in the box to the right. If you have any questions about the assignments, please leave a comment and I will respond there.

Fahrenheit 451

Amazon.com Review

“In Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury’s classic, frightening vision of the future, firemen don’t put out fires–they start them in order to burn books. Bradbury’s vividly painted society holds up the appearance of happiness as the highest goal–a place where trivial information is good, and knowledge and ideas are bad. Fire Captain Beatty explains it this way, “Give the people contests they win by remembering the words to more popular songs…. Don’t give them slippery stuff like philosophy or sociology to tie things up with. That way lies melancholy.”

Guy Montag is a book-burning fireman undergoing a crisis of faith. His wife spends all day with her television “family,” imploring Montag to work harder so that they can afford a fourth TV wall. Their dull, empty life sharply contrasts with that of his next-door neighbor Clarisse, a young girl thrilled by the ideas in books, and more interested in what she can see in the world around her than in the mindless chatter of the tube. When Clarisse disappears mysteriously, Montag is moved to make some changes, and starts hiding books in his home. Eventually, his wife turns him in, and he must answer the call to burn his secret cache of books. After fleeing to avoid arrest, Montag winds up joining an outlaw band of scholars who keep the contents of books in their heads, waiting for the time society will once again need the wisdom of literature.

Bradbury–the author of more than 500 short stories, novels, plays, and poems, including The Martian Chronicles and The Illustrated Man–is the winner of many awards, including the Grand Master Award from the Science Fiction Writers of America. Readers ages 13 to 93 will be swept up in the harrowing suspense of Fahrenheit 451, and no doubt will join the hordes of Bradbury fans worldwide. –Neil Roseman –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.”

The syllabus for the spring 2011 semester is now available for download to the right.

UPDATE: A syllabus with corrected dates is now available in the BOX to the right.

Gentlemen,

Your assignments for your final class of the semester are posted.

If you have any  questions, please let me know.

Mr. Oldacre

Gentlemen,

Class for tonight has been rescheduled. We will be meeting for our final class on December 14th.

Mr. Oldacre

Gentlemen,

If we moved our final class to December 14th, could all of you attend? Please respond in comments.

Thanks,

Mr. Oldacre

Josh raised a question about your poetry assignment. What should you write your original poem about? If you’ve already completed the poem, don’t worry about changing it. If you’re stuck and can’t think of anything to write about, here are some ideas to get you started:

– Nature: Observe water, animals, trees, the sky, etc., and work on describing what you see. How can you describe God’s creation in a way that captures the glory of the creation? What is unique about what your observing?

– Poetry: Write a poem about poetry. Why do we study poetry? What does poetry attempt to communicate?

– Food: Observe food; how it tastes, how it decays, how if functions in the world, a specific meal you enjoy, etc.

– Narrative: Write a poem in the style of the Wordsworth poem by telling a story about something mundane.

Whatever you do, make sure you HAVE YOUR OWN VOICE. Don’t try to sound like someone else. Spend time thinking about what you want to say before you write the poem. Have fun with this!

Mr. Oldacre